Posts Tagged ‘extremes’

Replicating Lewis et. al. (2017): Another Junk Paper

October 9, 2017

The recently released scarey predictions about “50 degree temperatures for Sydney and Melbourne” touted by Sophie Lewis are hardly worth wasting time on.  The paper is

Australia’s unprecedented future temperature extremes under Paris limits to warming, Sophie C. Lewis , Andrew D. King  and Daniel M. Mitchel, (no publication details available).

The paper is junk.  It has some very sciencey sounding words but is at heart pure speculation.  Like most “projections” by Global Warming Enthusiasts, the predictions are untestable.  Scarey temperatures are possible IF (and only if) IPCC scenarios are valid and we get either 1.5C or 2C warming by the last decade of the century.  That’s what the paper rests on.

The paper looks at Australian summer means, Coral Sea autumn means, and New South Wales and Victorian daily January maxima.  AWAP data are used for Australia and NSW and Victoria, and HadCruT4 for the Coral Sea region (which includes most of Queensland).

I have just looked at Australian Summer Means, and that was enough for me.  Lewis et.al. say that the decadal mean from 2091-2100 may have Australia wide summer means of 2 to 2.4 degrees above the mean of 2012-13, or 30.1 to 30.5C, with resultant very high daily maxima in southern cities.

I could have saved them the trouble, and at considerably less cost.

All I needed was the AWAP data for summer means (I purchased monthly AWAP data up to 2013 a couple of years ago), and plotted it with a 2nd order polynomial (quadratic) trend line:

lewis predictions summers1

And also showing decadal means (although the first and last decades have several missing summers):

lewis predictions summers2

There: the trend line goes smack through the higher (+2 degrees) projection, so it must be right!

Only trouble is, extrapolating with a quadratic trend is not a good idea. Lots can go wrong in the meantime.

So my plot is about as useful as the Lewis et.al. paper, and that’s not much.

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Watch an AWS Fail

August 30, 2017

(With thanks to Lance, Phill, and others)

A week ago, a colleague alerted me to strange behaviour at an Automatic Weather System at Borrona Downs in NSW.  This is a brand new weather station, with its first observation on 21 July.

Phill writes in an email:  Do you ever wonder why you get a shiver down your spine?  Pity the poor folks in the NSW far west.  

 From this mornings (20th  August) NSW observation list: The minimum temperature at Borrona Downs AWS was -62.5C at 9:59pm last night.  Probably some clowns with a bucket of dry ice or liquid nitrogen.  Perhaps Odin’s host crossed the night sky or maybe death just walked on by…  The individual reads don’t show anything lower than -37.5C also at 9:59 so the cold spike was quite sudden.  It went from -62.5C sometime between 21:58:00 and 21:59:00 to -37.5C at exactly 21:59:00 to -4.4C at 22:00:00.

I was too busy and preoccupied until now to follow this up, but I have a few days now.

Borrona Downs Station is in sandhill and claypan country in the far northwest of NSW:

Borrona Dns map

Borrona Dns aerial

Here is the Climate Data Online minima record (note minima indicated on two days):

Borrona Dns cdo

The following plots show the deterioration in the performance of the AWS.  Firstly, the comparison with Tibooburra, 110km away, showing a sudden change at 29 July:  Subtracting Borrona Downs data from Tibooburra shows that Borrona Downs Tmin is too high from this date.  The whole (brief) record should be scrapped.

Borrona Dns Tibooburra comp

But the devil, as Phill found, is in the detail.  Here is part of the record for the 19th:  Note the Low Temp at 9.59 pm, and I have indicated the official minimum for the day which would have occurred early that morning.

Borrona Dns 19 Aug

The Bureau has the minimum at 4.6C, but how was this value obtained?  The erroneous values, (including that of liquid nitrogen), are flagged, then manually removed, and the previous lowest temperature is retrieved from the one minute data for the day.  This also happened on the 26th:

Borrona Dns 26 Aug

Things got much worse on August 27th:

Borrona Dns 27 Aug

Why could no minimum be found?  Did the BOM realise that none of the data were reliable, and were essentially random errors?  Remember that the AWS records values every second, and the highest, lowest, and final second values for each minute are stored.  My guess is that many of these values were unreliable as well, even though many of the final second half hour values seem reasonable- for example 4.4C at 5.30 am.

This continued on August 28th   with an all time low of -69.5C:Borrona Dns 28 Aug

And the BOM ceased reporting values at 3:30 pm.

This description of events was confirmed by the Bureau’s response to a query:

“Do you know what is causing the very low temperature recordings?

There is a hardware fault within the AWS which is generating spurious values. The Bureau’s technicians are investigating but a site visit will be required.

Why was the August 19 low temperature recording not left blank?

Manual quality checking confirmed that the spiking on 19 August did not occur near the minimum  temperature for that day, as a result, the minimum temperature was recorded.”

This begs the question: is this what happened at Goulburn Airport on 2 July ? The initially reported figure of -10.4C was flagged as suspicious, so the previous low temperature of -10C was then reported, then this was removed , then the initial -10.4C was reinstated.  Perhaps.

-10.4C certainly should not have been flagged as too low for that location, as many other  values below 10C have been observed, including the record -10.9C recorded on 17 August 1994.  However, perhaps it was flagged as suspicious by comparison with the series of values before and after: too large a change in temperature from second to second.  But if so, why didn’t the BOM CEO just say so, instead of getting tangled in a web of conflicting explanations?

The AWS at Borrona Downs has failed.  So has the Bureau of Meteorology.

 

Garbage In, Garbage Out

August 7, 2017

(By Ken Stewart, assisted by Bill Johnston and Phill Goode; and cross-posted with Jo Nova)

Early ABC Radio news bulletins last Wednesday morning were led by this item, which you can read in full at ABC Online.

More climate scientists needed to avoid expensive mistakes, review urges

Apparently we urgently need 77 climate scientists to predict the future of areas like the Murray-Darling Basin with climate modelling.

Interestingly, Professor McDougall of the Australian Academy of Science points out that one of those “expensive mistakes” was the $2 billion desalination plant built in Queensland as a response to the millennium drought, “which really wasn’t an indication of climate change at all”.   Why didn’t the good professor raise his voice before the money was wasted?

But I digress.

Reliable modelling and projections for the future are surely desirable.

But such modelling must be based on reliable data, and the reliability of temperature data in Australia is demonstrably poor.

Example 1:  As has been widely reported in The Australian, and by Jennifer Marohasy and Jo Nova, cold temperatures at two separate sites (and possibly many others) were altered to appear warmer, then changed back, then deleted.  The BOM gave two conflicting explanations, both of which cast grave doubt on the reliability of “raw” temperature data from an unknown number of stations.

Example 2:  After enquiring why there are frequently two different temperature readings for exactly the same minute at various weather stations, a Bureau spokesperson told me that:

Firstly, we receive AWS data every minute. There are 3 temperature values:
1. Most recent one second measurement
2. Highest one second measurement (for the previous 60 secs)
3. Lowest one second measurement (for the previous 60 secs)

(See here and here.)

In other words, Australian maximum and minimum temperatures are taken from ONE SECOND readings from Automatic Weather Stations.  Spikes due to localised gusts of hot air, or instrument error, become the maximum for the day.  (This rarely has a large effect on minima, as night time temperatures are fairly smooth, whereas during the day temperature bounces rapidly up and down.  This is shown in this plot of temperatures at Thangool Airport in Queensland on Australia Day this year.)

Thangool 26 Jan 17 1 min

And this is for the same day between 3.00pm and 4.00pm.

Thangool 26 Jan 17 3 to 4pm

As you can see the temperature spikes up and down in the heat of the day by up to one degree between one minute and the next.  But these are the temperatures at the final second of each minute: during the intervening 59 seconds the temperature is spiking up and down as well, which we know because occasionally the highest or lowest temperature for the day occurs in the same minute as a final second recording on the BOM database (usually on the hour or half hour).  This can be up or down by two or three degrees in less than 60 seconds.

This is in contrast to the rest of the world.  The WMO recommends 1 minute (60 second) averages of temperature to be recorded to combat this very problem of noisy data, and this is followed in the UK.  In the USA 5 minute (300 second) averages are calculated.

From THE WEATHER OBSERVER’S HANDBOOK by Stephen Burt (Cambridge University Press, 2012):

Observers handbook

Even without software or human interference as in Example 1, this means Australian temperature data, in particular maxima, are not reliable.

Example 3:  Historically, temperatures were observed from Liquid In Glass (LIG) thermometers.  From the 1990s, Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) were installed using Platinum Resistance Thermometers (PRT) and are now the source for daily data.  AWS thermometers are very precise, but as I showed in Example 2, their data is used idiosyncratically to record 1 second spikes, frequently resulting in higher maxima and less often slightly lower minima than a 1 or 5 minute average.

One would think that with such a major change in technology there would be comparative studies reported in the BOM’s meteorological journal or other “peer reviewed” literature.  Apparently not.

Dr Bill Johnston has investigated this and says:

Parallel data were collected all over Australia for over a decade, some until last year when thermometers were removed, at manned sites, mainly major airports (Ceduna, Sydney, Hobart, Perth, Darwin, Alice Springs, Albany, Norfolk Island, Wagga to name a few) and also met-offices such as Cobar and Giles. However, comparisons between screens were done at one site only (Broadmeadows, Melbourne, which is not even an official weather station) using PRT only and reported as a “preliminary report”, which is available (https://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/IMOP/WebPortal-AWS/Tests/ITR649.pdf) however, after AWS became primary instruments, as I’ve reported before, the Bureau had an internal policy that parallel liquid-in-glass thermometer data were not databased. Furthermore, they had another policy that paper-data was destroyed after 2-years. So there is nothing that is easily available…. there is also no multi-site replicated study involving screen types and thermometers vs. PRT probes ….

Deliberate destruction of data is scandalous; the only way now to compare Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) and Liquid in Glass, is to hunt for sites where there is overlap between two stations; where the AWS is given a new number. This is possible BUT the problem is that the change-over is invariably confounded with either a site move or the change to a small screen.

Therefore we suspect that the introduction and reliance on AWS has led to artificially higher maxima (and thus record temperatures) than in the past, but we have no way of knowing for sure or how much.

So we now have (1) temperatures that are altered before they even become ‘raw’ data; (2) use of one second spikes for recording daily maximum and minimum temperatures, very probably resulting in artificially high maxima and slightly lower minima; and (3) no way of telling how the resulting data compare with those from historical liquid-in-glass thermometers.

How can the CSIRO hope to produce reliable climate modelling with any number of climate scientists when the BOM cannot produce reliable temperature data?  Garbage in, garbage out.

How Temperature Is “Measured” in Australia: Part 1

March 1, 2017

By Ken Stewart, ably assisted by Chris Gillham, Phillip Goode, Ian Hill, Lance Pidgeon, Bill Johnston, Geoff Sherrington, Bob Fernley-Jones, and Anthony Cox.

The Bureau of Meteorology maintains the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), one of the most useful climate and weather records in the world.  In About SOI,  the Bureau says:

 Daily or weekly values of the SOI do not convey much in the way of useful information about the current state of the climate, and accordingly the Bureau of Meteorology does not issue them. Daily values in particular can fluctuate markedly because of daily weather patterns, and should not be used for climate purposes.

It is a pity that the BOM doesn’t follow this approach with temperature, and in fact goes to the opposite extreme.

Record temperatures, maximum and minimum temperatures, and monthly, seasonal, and annual analyses are based not on daily values but on ONE SECOND VALUES.

The Bureau reports daily maximum and minimum temperatures at Climate Data Online,   but also gives a daily summary for each site in more detail on the State summary observations page , and a continuous 72 hour record of 30 minute observations (examples below), issued every 30 minutes, with the page automatically refreshed every 10 minutes, also handily graphed .  These last two pages have the previous 72 hours of readings, after which they disappear for good.  However, the State summary page, also refreshed every 10 minutes, is for the current calendar day only.

This screenshot shows part of the Queensland observations page for February 26, showing the stations in the North Tropical Coast and Tablelands district.

Fig. 1:  District summary page

mareeba-example

Note especially the High Temp of 30.5C at 01:26pm.  Clicking on the station name at the left takes us to the Latest Weather Observations for Mareeba page:

Fig. 2:  Latest Observations for Mareeba

mareeba detail example.jpg

Notice that temperature recordings are shown every 30 minutes, on the hour and half hour.

In Figure 1 I have circled the Low Temp and High Temp for Mareeba.  Except in unusual circumstances, High Temp and Low Temp values become the maximum and minimum temperatures and are listed on the Climate Data Online page, and for stations that are part of the ACORN network, become part of the official climate record.  It is most important that these High Temp and Low Temp values, the highest and lowest recorded temperatures of each day, should be accurate and trustworthy.

But frequently they are higher or lower than the half hourly observations, as in the Mareeba example (0.6C higher), and I wanted to know why.  In this post I show some recent examples, with the explanation from the Bureau.

Perhaps the difference between the Latest Weather Observations and maximum temperature reported at Climate Data Online is due to brief spikes in temperature in between the reported temperatures of the latest observations, such as in this example from Amberley RAAF on February 12.

Fig. 3:  Amberley RAAF temperatures, 12 February 2017

amberley-12-feb

A probable cause would be that the Automatic Weather Station probe is extremely sensitive to sudden changes in temperature as breezes blow warmer or cooler air around or a cloud passes over the sun.

However, this may not be the whole story.

Occasionally the report time for the High Temp or Low Temp is exactly on the hour or half hour, and therefore can be directly compared with the temperature shown for that time at the station’s page.

These progressive Low and/or High Temps on the half hour or hour occur and can be observed throughout the day at various times, as well as at the end of the reporting period.

For example, here is a mid-afternoon screenshot of the Queensland- Wide Bay and Burnett district summary for Wednesday 15th February.  I have highlighted the High Temp value for Maryborough at 1:00pm.

Fig. 4:  District summary at 2:00pm for Maryborough 15 February 2017

obs-mboro-15th

In the Latest Observations for Maryborough, I have highlighted the 1:00pm reading.

Fig. 5: Latest Observations at Maryborough at 01:00pm on 15 February

obs-mboro-15th-detail

The difference is +1.5 degrees.  Here I have graphed the results.

Fig. 6:  Maryborough 15 February

mboro-15th-graph

That’s a 1.5 degree difference at the exact same minute.

Here is a screenshot of Latest Observations values at Hervey Bay Airport on Wednesday 22 February.  Low Temp for the morning of 23.2C was reached at 6.00 a.m.

Fig. 7:  Hervey Bay, 06:00am  22 February 2017

hervey-bay-22nd

Note that at 6.00am, just after sunrise, the Latest Observations page shows that the temperature was 25.3 degrees.  The daily Low Temp was reported as 23.2 degrees at 6.00am – 2.1 degrees cooler.  This graph will show the discrepancy more plainly.

Fig. 8:  Hervey Bay temperatures 22 February

hervey-bay-22nd-graph

What possible influence would cause a dawn temperature to drop 2.1 degrees?

I sent a query to the Bureau about Hervey Bay, and the explanation from the Bureau’s officer was enlightening:

Firstly, we receive AWS data every minute. There are 3 temperature values:
1. Most recent one second measurement
2. Highest one second measurement (for the previous 60 secs)
3. Lowest one second measurement (for the previous 60 secs)

Relating this to the 30 minute observations page: For an observation taken at 0600, the values are for the one minute 0559-0600.

I’ve looked at the data for Hervey Bay at 0600 on the 22nd February.
25.3, 25.4, 23.2 .

The temperature reported each half hour on the station Latest Observations page is the instantaneous temperature at that exact second, in this case 06:00:00, and the High Temp or Low Temp for the day is the highest or lowest one second temperature out of every minute for the whole day so far.  There is no filtering or averaging.

The explanation for the large discrepancy was that “Sometimes the initial heating from the sun causes cooler air closer to the ground to mix up to the temperature probe (1.2m above ground).”

However, in Figure 7 above it can be seen that the wind was south east at 17 km/hr, gusting to 26 km/hr, and had been like that all night, over flat ground at the airport, so an unmixed cooler surface layer mixing up to the probe seems very unlikely.

You will also note that the temperatures in the final second of every half hour period from 12.30 to 6.30 ranged from 25C to 25.5C, yet in some second in the final minute before 6.00 a.m. it was at 23.2C.  I have shown these values in the graph below.

Fig. 9:  Hervey Bay 05:59 to 06:00am

hervey-bay-22nd-at-6am

The orange row shows the highest temperature for this last minute at 25.4C at some unknown second, the blue row the lowest temperature for this minute (and for the morning) at 23.2C at some unknown second, and the spot temperature of 25.3C at exactly 06:00:00am.  The black lines show the upper and lower values of half hourly readings between 12:30 and 06:30: the high temp and 06:00am readings are within this range.

23.2C looks a lot like instrument error, and not subject to any filtering.

Further, there are only two possibilities:  either from a low of 23.2C, the temperature rose 2.2 degrees to 25.4C, then down to 25.3C; or else from a high of 25.4C it fell 2.2 degrees to 23.2C, then rose 2.1 degrees to 25.3C, all in the 60 seconds or less prior to 06:00:00 a.m.

How often does random instrument error affect the High and Low Temps reported at the other 526 stations?  Like Thargomindah, where on February 12 the High Temp was 2.3 degrees to 2.5 degrees higher than the temperatures 15 minutes before and after?

Fig. 10:  Thargomindah temperatures 12 February 2017

thargomindah-12-feb

Or was this due to a sudden rise and fall caused by a puff of wind, even a whirl-wind?

Who knows?  The Bureau certainly doesn’t.

 

In Part 2, I will look at patterns arising from analysis of 200 High and Low Temps occurring in the same minute as the half hourly values, and implications this has for our climate record.

Another ABC Fail

February 5, 2017

Viewers of ABC-TV news, and followers of ABC News Online, were treated to a story on Friday night about “Turtle hatchlings dying in extreme heat at Mon Repos”, as it was headlined at ABC News Online:

Piles of dead turtle hatchlings are lining Queensland’s famous Mon Repos beach amid a heatwave which has pushed the sand’s temperature to a record 75 degrees Celsius.

While the majority of hatchlings break free from their nests at night when the sand is cooler, those escaping in the day face overheating.

“They can’t sweat, they can’t pant, so they’ve got no mechanism for cooling,” Department of Environment and Heritage Protection chief scientist Dr Col Limpus said.

….

The extreme heat is also conducted down to the turtle’s nest, pushing the temperature to about 34C, which is approaching the lethal level for incubation.

That is the hottest temperature recorded in a nest in more than a decade.

A record 75 degrees sand temperature? Hottest nest temperature in more than a decade?

Time for a reality check.

I have no data on temperatures inside turtle nests, but I do have data on temperature at nearby Bundaberg Aero (Hinkler Airport), which is an ACORN site.

Using monthly Acorn data, here is a plot of all January maxima at Bundy.

bundy-jan-max

January’s mean maximum of 31.6 degrees C was equalled or exceeded in 1924, 1931, 1969, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2013, and 2014.  While monthly mean doesn’t tell us about individual days, it does give us a clue about daily temperatures in hot years.  For that I also use ACORN daily data- adjusted, homogenised, and world’s best practice apparently.

How do temperatures at this time of year compare with those of previous years?  The next figures show data for the first 45 days of every year, that is from January 1 to February 14.

bundy-jan-max-daily-45

The past three weeks at Bundaberg have been at the high end of the range, but no records have been broken, and no days have been even close to 35C.  What about previous years?  The next plot shows the number of consecutive days above 35 degrees: very likely to raise sand temperature above what it has been this year.

bundy-jan-max-daily-45-over-35

No days this year above 35C, but at least 27 occasions in previous years of single days reaching 35C, at least 6 of 2 days in a row, and one of 3 days in a row above 35C.

A 7 day running mean will show whether temperatures have been consistently high.

bundy-jan-max-7d-av-45

As you can see 2017 is high but not extreme.  2002 had a 7 day average just under 35C.

This graph plots temperatures of the first 45 days of years with similarly hot January temperatures.  2017 is the thick black line.

bundy-jan-max-daily-45-hot-yrs

On one day- January 20- 2017 was hotter than the other years.  Note how in several years the temperature drops to the mid 20s when heavy rain falls.  Note also the temperature reached the high 30s in February 2002.

The final graph shows the 7 day average of the same period of similarly hot years.

bundy-jan-max-7d-av-45-hot-yrs

Several previous periods were hotter than so far this year.

Once again we see misleading claims being made and reported by the ABC as gospel, without any attempt at fact checking.  A simple check shows that, while it may be true that the reported temperatures are the hottest recorded by these researchers, it is extremely unlikely that these were as high as they were in past years.  On every count- daily, monthly mean, 7 day mean, consecutive hot days- it can be shown that this year, while hot, is not as hot as many previously, and it follows that sand temperatures would similarly have been hotter in the past.

And that’s without considering the Holocene Optimum and the Eemian.

Another ABC fail.

Unprecedented South Australian Weather!

January 22, 2017

(and it has been like that for 178 years!)

There were more blackouts in South Australia a couple of days ago following a wild storm.  In a report in the Adelaide Advertiser, SA Power Networks spokesperson Paul Roberts is quoted:

“This is just another example of the unprecedented weather in the last six months,” Mr Roberts said, referring to bouts of wild weather that have hit power supplies hard this summer and the preceding spring.

21mm of rain was measured at the Kent Town gauge.

Just how “unprecedented” is Adelaide’s weather over the past few months?  I couldn’t find any records for the number of severe storms, so for a proxy I have made do with rainfall data from West Terrace and Kent Town in Adelaide.  The overlap period has very similar rainfall recordings so I joined the two series to give a record starting on 1 January 1839.  That’s 178 years of data.

When thinking about “unprecedented”, we need to check amount, intensity, and frequency.

Firstly, a few plots to give some context.  How unprecedented was Thursday’s storm?

Fig. 1: Rainfall for the first 21 days of January compared with Days 1 – 21 of every year

adelaide-rain-21-jan

Note Thursday’s rainfall had less rain than four previous occasions on this day alone, and 20 or so in previous Januarys.

Fig. 2: Rainfall for each day of 2016 compared with each day of every year:

adelaide-rain-2016

Note the December storm had extreme rain (for Adelaide) but not a record.

Amount and intensity has been higher in many previous years.  141.5mm was recorded on 7 February 1925.

Fig. 3: 7 day average rainfall over the years:

adelaide-rain-2016-7d-avg

The topmost dot shows the maximum 7 day average for each year.  2016 got to 13.4mm on 4 October- multiply by 7 to get the weekly total rain.  Note there were many wet and dry periods all through the record.

21mm of rain fell in a severe storm on Thursday, so I arbitrarily chose 20mm as my criterion for heavy rainfall in one day as a probable indicator of stormy weather.  I am the first to admit that 20mm might fall steadily all day and not be at all associated with wild winds, and wild winds can occur without any rain, but bear with me.

Fig. 4: Rain over 20mm throughout the year:

adelaide-rain-2016-above-20

There seems to be no increase in amount or intensity of rain at any time of the year.

Fig. 5: Frequency:

adelaide-rain-2016-cnt-above-20

Note 2016 had 7 days with above 20mm in 24 hours.  That’s the most since… 2000, when there were 8 days- and many previous years had 7 or 8 days, and 1889 had 9.  So no increase in frequency.

However, Mr Roberts was referring to the last six months, spring and summer.  So let’s look at rain events over 20mm from July to December, firstly amounts recorded:

Fig. 6: July to December Rain over 20mm:

adelaide-rain-above-20-last-6m

Nothing unusual about 2016.

Fig. 7:  Frequency of heavy rain July – December:

adelaide-rain-2016-cnt-above-20-last-6m

1973, 1978, and 1992 had the same or more days with over 20mm.

I now restrict the count to spring and summer only:

Fig. 8:  Spring and Summer frequency:

adelaide-rain-2016-cnt-above-20-last-4m

Not unprecedented: 1992 had one more.  Add in last Thursday’s event to make them equal.

Conclusion

Adelaide has a long climate record, showing daily rainfall has varied greatly over the years.  There is no recent increase in amount, intensity, or frequency for the whole year, or for the last six months or four months.  Spring and summer rainfall in 2016 was not unprecedented, and to the extent that spring and summer falls over 20mm are a proxy for storms, there is no evidence for an increase in wild weather.  This is normal.  Get used to it, Mr Roberts, and make sure the electricity network can cope.

 

Putting Temperature in Context: Pt 2

December 14, 2016

To show how handy my Excel worksheet is, here’s one I did in the last 15 minutes.

Apparently Sydney has had its warmest December minimum on record at 27.1 C.  The record before that was Christmas Day, 1868 at 26.3C.

The following seven plots show this in context.

Fig. 1:  The annual range in Sydney’s minima:

whole-yr-sydney-min

Extremes in minima can occur any time between October and March.

Fig. 2:  The first 2 weeks of December

14d-sydney-min

Plainly, a new record was set this morning, but apart from Day 340 the other days are within the normal range.

Fig. 3:  7 day mean of Tmin in this period

7d-avg-sydney-min

Extreme, but a number of previous years had warmer averages.

Fig. 4:  Consecutive days above 20C Tmin.

days-over-20-sydney

But there have been longer periods of warm minima in the past.

Now let’s look at the same metric, but for all of December.

Fig. 5:  All Decembers (including leap years).

december-sydney-min

A record for December, with 1868 in second place.

Fig. 6:  7 day mean of Tmin for Decembers

7d-avg-sydney-min-december

Seven day periods of warm nights are not new.  The horizontal black line shows the average to this morning (20.6C) is matched or exceeded by a dozen other Decembers.  (Of course this December isn’t half way through yet.)  Also note what appears to be a step change about 1970.

Fig. 7:  Consecutive days above 20C Tmin in December.

days-over-20-sydney-december

I doubt if 15 December will be as warm as today, but could still be over 20C.

This is weather, not global warming.

 

Putting Daily Temperature in Context

December 14, 2016

In this post I demonstrate a simple way of comparing current temperatures for a particular location with those previously recorded.  In this way it is possible to show the climatic context.

Using data from Climate Data Online, I plot maximum temperature for each day of the year, and then for a particular short period: in this case the last week of November and the first week of December, which coincides with the recent very warm spell here in Queensland.  To account for leap and ordinary years this period is 15 days.  In ordinary years 24th November is Day 328 and 7th December is Day 341, while in leap years this same calendar period is Day 329 to 342.  I also calculate the running 7 day mean TMax for this period, and the number of consecutive days above 35C.

To put the recent heatwave in context, I have chosen six locations from Central and Southern Queensland which regularly feature on ABC-TV weather: Birdsville, Charleville, Roma, Longreach, Ipswich (Amberley RAAF), and Rockhampton.

Birdsville:

Fig. 1

whole-yr-birdsville

The Police Station data are from 1954 to 2005, and the Airport from 2000.  This shows the range of temperatures throughout the year.  The red arrow indicates the current period.   The next plot shows data only for the period in question.

Fig. 2:  24 November- 7 December: Airport data

14d-comp-birdsville-air

Note there were three days where the temperature this year was the highest for those days since 2000, but didn’t exceed the highest in this time period, which was in November.  The other days were well within the historic range.

For interest, let’s now see how this year compares with the Police Station record.  (The average difference in TMax during the overlap period was 0.0 to 0.3C.)

Fig. 3:  24 November- 7 December: Police Station data

14d-comp-birdsville-police

In a similar range.

Fig. 4

7d-avg-birdsville

This heatwave was the third hottest since 2000 and fifth overall.

Fig. 5

days-over-35-birdsville-air

Five previous periods had more consecutive days above 35C.  2006 had 22.

Charleville:

Fig. 6: Charleville Aero since 1942

whole-yr-charleville-aero

Temperatures in this period reached the extremes of the range on three days.

(Although the Post Office record begins in 1889, there are too many errors in the overlap period so the two records can’t be compared.)

Fig. 7:

14d-charleville-aero

A new record for early December was set, but note this was the same temperature as 29th November 2006.

Fig. 8:

7d-avg-charleville-aero

Definitely the hottest for this period since 1942.

Fig. 9:

days-over-35-charleville-aero

Note this was not the longest warm spell by a mile: there were many previous periods with up to 26 consecutive days above 35C.

Roma

Fig. 10:

whole-yr-roma

Although there is not one day of overlap so the two records can’t be compared, you can see that Airport (from 1992) and Post Office records are similar.

Fig. 11:

14d-comp-roma-air

A new record for this time of year was set: 44.4C, and six days in a row above 40C.  Pretty hot….

Fig. 12:

days-over-35-roma-air

…but there were longer hot periods in the past (since 1992).

Longreach

Fig. 13:  Longreach Aero since 1966.

whole-yr-longreach-aero

Fig. 14:

14d-longreach-aero

Hot, but no record.

Although there is good overlap with the Post Office, temperatures for this period differ too much: from -1 to +0.7C.

Fig. 15:

7d-avg-longreach-aero

Fifth hottest period since 1966.

Fig. 16:

days-over-35-longreach-aero

And in the past there have been up to 47 consecutive days above 35C at this time of year.

Ipswich (Amberley RAAF):

Fig. 17:

whole-yr-amberley

Fig. 18:

14d-amberley

Not unusually hot for this time of year.

Fig. 19:

7d-avg-amberley

Ninth hottest since 1941.

Fig. 20:

days-over-35-amberley

Hotter for longer in the past.

Rockhampton:

Fig. 21:

whole-yr-rocky

Fig. 22:

14d-rocky-air

Very hot, but no records.  (The heat lasted another two days, with 36.6 and 37.3 on 8th and 9th.)

Fig. 23:

7d-avg-rocky

Fourth hottest 7 day average on record (since 1939).

Fig. 24:

days-over-35-rocky-air

Again, a number of hot days, but there were as many and more in the past.

To conclude: the recent heatwave was very hot certainly, and was extreme in southern inland Queensland.  While Charleville had the highest seven day mean temperature on record, NO location had as many consecutive hot days (above 35C) as in the past.

This is a handy method for showing daily data in context.  It can used for any period of the year, can be tuned to suit (I chose TMax above 35C, but temperatures below a set figure could be found), and can be used for any daily data.

If you would like a comparison done for a location that interests you, let me know in comments including time period and parameters of interest (e.g. Sydney, first 2 weeks of December, TMax above 30C say, or Wangaratta, September, daily rainfall over 10mm say.)

When Tmax and Tmin Are Poor at Describing Weather

October 25, 2016

Last Sunday was a miserable day in Rockhampton- overcast with drizzling rain and cold all day.  Mean maximum for October is 29.7 degrees, so the maximum reported by the Bureau of 20.4 was 9.5 degrees below average, as expected.  However, that does not tell you anything like the whole story.

Here is the temperature graph from the Bureau for the period midday Saturday to midday Tuesday.  The solid horizontal line shows the duration of Sunday 23rd, and the thin black vertical lines show 9.00 a.m., which is the time when the daily minimum and the previous day’s maximum are recorded.   Temperatures at recording times are circled.

rocky-temp-23-oct

On fine, clear days, minima usually occur around sunrise and maxima in the early afternoon: you can see this on the 22nd, 24th, and (almost) on the 25th.  Sunday 23rd was wet.  As you can see the temperature was falling fairly steadily from Saturday afternoon until Monday morning.   The maximum for Sunday was 22.7 at midnight, and the coldest temperature on Sunday was 14.3 from 7.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. on Sunday night- not the 17.6 at 9.00 a.m.   The official maximum for Sunday of 20.4 degrees was actually the temperature at 9.00 a.m. on Monday!

So what was the Diurnal Temperature Range?  Was 20.6 (or 22.7) a good representation of how high the temperature “rose”?  The temperature in the early afternoon varied between 15 and 16.4, and this was about 14 degrees below normal for this time of the year (and two to three degrees below the official lowest maximum of 18.1 on 10th October 1982).

Which is one reason I don’t take a lot of notice of claims of hottest or coldest extremes.

Open Letter to Bob Baldwin

June 15, 2015

Dear Mr Baldwin

What does it take to get action following a formal complaint?

I draw your immediate personal attention to this matter.

It is now fully 11 weeks since I submitted four simple questions to Dr Vertessy’s office (Reference REF2015-089-17) , nine weeks since my follow up request with a copy to you, and four weeks since I made a formal complaint to you.  Sam Hussey-Smith of your office emailed me on Tuesday 19th May, saying he would “seek to get a response as soon as possible”.

Still nothing.

I may be a mere insignificant individual with a minor query, but surely I deserve to be treated with a little respect, and surely the Bureau of Meteorology, the Environment Department, and the office of its Parliamentary Secretary, all need to demonstrate transparency and public accountability.

Perhaps Dr Vertessy hopes I will get sick of waiting and will lose interest, saving him the embarrassment of an apology and a probable retraction.   He should not underestimate my determination.  The longer he delays, the more it looks as if he has something to hide.

I seek your urgent personal intervention to ensure an immediate response.

Yours sincerely

Ken Stewart

 

Here is my formal complaint, sent 4 weeks ago (18 May).

Dear Mr Baldwin

Formal Complaint re: Dr Bob Vertessy, Director and C.E.O. of the Bureau of Meteorology

It is seven weeks since I submitted four questions to Dr Bob Vertessy, Director and C.E.O. of the Bureau of Meteorology, through the Bureau’s feedback channels, and two full weeks since I followed this up with a complaint with a copy to your office.  The Bureau acknowledged receipt (ReferenceREF2015-089-17) and an officer of the Bureau has confirmed that my queries were indeed passed on to the Director’s office.  However, there has been no other response at all, either from the Bureau or from your own office.

Seven weeks, Mr Baldwin, seven weeks!  This is beyond simple negligence.  It is now in the realm of conscious breach of the Bureau’s own Service Charter for the Community proudly displayed athttp://www.bom.gov.au/inside/services_policy/serchart.shtml .

Dr Vertessy demonstrably fails to meet several elements of his own Charter, in that:

  • I have not been treated with respect and courtesy;
  • The Director has not been clear and helpful in his dealings with me, and has given no reason for delay;
  •  My enquiries, which it appears the Director cannot answer, have not been referred to an appropriate source;
  • The Director has not dealt with my enquiries and subsequent complaints quickly and effectively;
  • The Charter claims the Bureau will “Reply to your letters, faxes and e-mails within two weeks – on more complex issues, our initial reply will give you an estimate of the time a full response will take, and the cost, if any.”  While lower level officers reply courteously well within this time (usually within hours or at most days), it seems the CEO is above this requirement.

It seems the Bureau has a long way to go in its aim to “Develop a more streamlined system of handling your enquiries and feedback on our services”.

I therefore request that you act to obtain for me an immediate reply to my queries from Dr Vertessy.  I also expect his apology and an explanation for not meeting “acceptable standards of quality, timeliness or accuracy”.

Until then, Dr Vertessy’s lack of response speaks volumes about his own credibility as a scientist, a communicator, and the Bureau head, as well as the credibility and accountability of the Bureau of Meteorology as a whole.

Yours sincerely

 

 

 

Ken Stewart